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Character Cards


Character cards:

The ‘character’ type cards (キャラクターカード kyarakutā kādo, “character cards”) are those that the player will mostly use to execute their attacks against the enemy player. Depending on the attributes that the player is accumulating from their client, they will be able to advance (ir sacando) according to what characters along the game --those who will be able to physically attack-- use spells (those with magical capabilities), or use different abilities.

In many cases, these abilities and how they are used will allow the complete return to the development of the games. You have already seen, in the section about ‘client’ type cards, the 10 different attributes that exist in the game, and that each client will be able to use up to a maximum of 4 of them. Each character has between 2 and 3 different attributes and it is indicated that you need said quantities in order to be able to invoke them on the battlefield. What is important to know is that only 1 of the attributes that appears on the character cards will be necessary to invoke it.

[image: a green triangle on the left with a 3 in the middle of it and a red square on the right of it with a 4 in the middle of it]

So that you can understand it without problems, I fixed an image on the right. On it you see two attributes with two different quantities: popularity (3), and common sense (4). If you want to invoke this character, the player will need to have accumulated 3 popularity points, or 4 common sense points, but they do not need to have both. Because they are the same character cards used to attack, they must, of course, have the values of attack and defense. These are seen on the upper part of the cards, in the form of 4 numerical values divided into 2 parts identified with a sword and a shield.

[image: a black oval split into two parts with “x/x” on each]

Hit probability - power - resistance - evasion

The sword symbolizes the attack statistic, divided into 2 concepts: hit probability and power. On one hand, hit probability indicates the possibility of hitting an enemy, so with a higher number, it is more likely that you will get a hit (in other words, it is the speed of the character’s attack). On the other hand, power indicates the specific damage that the enemy would receive if hit.

The shield symbolizes the defense statistic, also divided into 2 concepts: resistance and evasion. Resistance is the amount of damage that the character can resist before they are defeated, meanwhile, evasion is the possibility of avoiding the attack and not suffering the damage.

When executing an attack, you must compare the attack statistics of the attacking character with the defense statistics of the attacking character. First, compare the hit probability of the attacker with the evasion of the enemy. If the evasion is superior, the enemy directly avoids the attack and receives no damage. If the hit probability is superior, the second part of combat occurs. In this, you compare the power of the attacker with the resistance of the enemy. If the power is superior, the enemy is defeated, while if the resistance is superior, you will receive the damage but will continue with life.

To make sure that the damage points suffered by a character don’t accumulate, if a character is not defeated during an attack (if directly by the character or with the help of some spell or ‘support’ card), you can automatically recover all of your resistance points. Also, the characters don’t counter-attack, so the attacking character doesn’t suffer damage on part of the enemy character during their attack (this is a general rule, but you can have exceptions created for the effects of spells, ‘support’ cards, or special abilities). If you still do not understand very well, I will give you an example below


EXAMPLE: On one side, we have character A, who has the statistics (¼)(8/1) [hit probability 1, power 4, resistance 8, evasion 1]. On the other side, we have character B, who has the statistics (4/8)(8/4) [hit probability 4, power 8, resistance 8, evasion 4]. Case 1: A attacks B - Phase 1: compare the hit probability of character A, 1, with the evasion statistic of character B, 4. Character B has more evasion, so they avoid the attack of A and combat ends without anyone having suffered any damage. Case 2: B attacks A - Phase 1: compare the hit probability of character B, 4, with the with the evasion statistic of character A, 4. This reduces to 0 as it is considered that A has not moved fast enough to evade the power of the hit, and the turn ends with that. - Phase 2: compare the power statistic of the character B, 8, with the resistance statistic of character A, 8. The resistance of character A will be reduced to 0, and with this, character A is defeated. Finally, let’s pretend that the resistance of character A was 9. In this case, after receiving damage from B’s attack, their resistance would be left at 1, so the character would’ve survived the attack and, automatically, and would recover their base resistance.

This is important to remember since many other games of this type have the damage received accumulate for the whole turn and do not restore base values until the end of the turn, or in some cases, they never restore values at all.

The character’s name can seem like something trivial and unnecessary to take into account, but this is not the case, at least, not in this game. The main reason for this is the fact that every player cannot use more than 1 card of the same character in their battlefield at the same time, although you can use a card that the enemy player is also using. In other words, you can have 2 cards of the same character at a time on the entire battlefield, but only 1 per player. Furthermore, you must keep track of the cards that are in the battlefield at one time so that you do not have one of the same name more than once.

You will understand this better with an example. Pretend that in your hand you have the character cards ‘Gourry Gabriev’ and ‘Serious Gourry’. These are 2 different cards with different statistics and different abilities, but they share the same name, ‘Gourry’. Therefore, you cannot use them at the same time on your battlefield. On the other hand, pretend that your opponent has exactly these 2 same cards. In the same way, they can only use 1 of them at a time on their battlefield. But you do not have any problem using the same card at the same time as your opponent on your respective battlefields.

[far left image: one “Serious Gourry” card and one “Gourry Gabriev” card with an X on them. The text above says “allied battlefield”] [inner left image: one “Serious Gourry” card with a check on it. The text above says “enemy battlefield”] [both left images are grouped together] [inner right image: one “Serious Gourry” card with a check on it. The text above says “allied battlefield”] [far right image: one “Serious Gourry” card with a check on it. The text above says “enemy battlefield”] [both right images are grouped together]

[here!]

Character type also has a way to account for the characters, now that there are certain characters that will be more or less effective against a certain type, or spells or effects that affect those types or not. Or at least that occur with some of them, others are merely informative or included with the sole intention of being funny. I will continue to provide examples below.

[nts: reword top sentence]

To give us a clear example, the characters that are mazoku type cannot be attacked in melee in normal circumstances (in other words, except for a specific special ability that can attack them in this way), and can only use black and astral spells against them.

Man - woman - mazoku - chimera - monster - undead - golem - demon - “great lizard” - octopus

[image: purple dot with “L3”]

The character level is not something that normally has to be taken into account during the game except in very specific cases, but it is very important in case said character is defeated, now the numerical level value of the character needs to be addressed like the points won by the player that defeats them. In normal circumstances, when a character is defeated they will not be placed in the ‘graveyard’ deck but in the ‘scoring’ deck, and like i have said, your level will be added to the score of the player that defeats them. If due to some specific effect the character is discarded in the ‘graveyard’ deck, the player that defeated them will not win any points. Furthermore, if a character that was previously defeated is brought back to the battlefield by means of some effect, the player that had defeated them will lose the corresponding score to their level.

The magic points indicate the capability that a character has to use spells. Like explained in the section dedicated to ‘spell’ type cards, it is not the player nor is it the client that uses the spells, but it is the characters themselves that use them, depending on if they have a sufficient magical capability. Like in the series, magic is divided into 3 types: spiritual, white, and black, and and also, in a case only with the character Filia, who has divine magic (there is also a special case in which a pair of cards that have Orphen as the protagonist, in these they have their own icon that indicates their use of black magic). According to the points that a character has for each type of magic, you will be able to use these spells or others, being able to increase this capability by means of different effects of cards or special abilities. These points do not run out, unless they are permanent or you use them all while the character is on the battlefield, with the only limitation being that a character cannot cast more than 1 spell at a time.

Black - white - spiritual - divine - black

The values of cooperation indicate with what other characters can the character execute group attacks or help in the defense of received attacks. There are 6 values of cooperation, indicated by 6 letters: A, B, C, D, E, and Z. The active values are displayed with a normal shade of colour, while the values that said character cannot use are found with a muted shade. A character can cooperate with at least one of these shared values, and said cooperation comes in 2 forms: support and protection.

[image: 6 green dots with the letters A, B, C, D, E, and Z.]

Support cooperation has one a point in which a character in the vanguard prepares to execute a melee attack, and this attack unites connects [nts: find better word] with a character of the rearguard. In this case, the values of hit probability and power of the attacker both increase 1 point, but not the evasion or the resistance (seeing that, being an attack, it is unnecessary).

If for any reason this attacking character suffers damage during the attack (by means of some special ability or spell), the said character would just receive the damage, not the character in the rearguard that gave support; that character would remain safe at all times.

Cooperation by protection has a certain time when an enemy can melee attack a character in the rearguard. A character in the vanguard leaves in their defense, making them the only objective of the attack. In this case, there is not any type of gain for the values or statistics, nor attack or defense.

Special ability

Just like the clients have their own objective and weakness, each character has only one special ability. This can be of every type, as it is meant to help the power of the attack and is more effective against certain characters or types, increasing or reducing the player’s statistics or those of their characters, and there are others that affect enemy characters or the enemy player themself. Many of these abilities can be used whether said character is attacking or not, others require that the character does not attack on their turn, and in some cases, the ability can be effective only under certain circumstances and in certain moments, like when a character is entering the battlefield or when they have been defeated, while others will be active throughout the whole game.

In some cases, this special ability can really be a hindrance for certain characters, like their inability to face certain characters or their inability to act in certain circumstances. For example, the character ‘Sylphiel’ remains unusable while you have a ‘Gourry’ character in the enemy battlefield.

Below, you can find a basic example of the ‘character’ card type with all of the different parameters and explanations, and on the opposite side of the table, an example of a card of the same type. As you can see, the colour that characterizes this type of card is purple, making it even further distinct from other specifications, like attack and defense statistics, the magic points (in this case, those of a sorcerer) and values of cooperation.

[left image: a purple character card numbered 1-15. The text says ‘this is a character card’] [right image: a purple character card. The text underneath ‘black fox’ says ‘man’. The top red bubble with the number 4 says ‘spiritual’ and the bubble underneath it says ‘white’. The oval on at the bottom of the picture says ‘character’. The oval at the top of the box says ‘special’ and the text next to it says ‘splendid theft (normal)’. The text under this says ‘in a place of attacking, you can make it so that the enemy player has to discard one fate card’.

Attributes: the attributes and what can invoke the character and necessary quantity of them. In this example, you can invoke them through ‘3 points of common sense’ or by ‘4 points of popularity’. (2) Attack statistics: the hit possibility and power values of the character. In this case, ‘hit possibility 7’ and ‘power 2’, that is to say, they are a character that is quick at attacking but do not cause much damage. (3) Defense statistics: the resistance and evasion values of the character. In this case, ‘resistance 3’ and ‘6 evasion’, in other words, they are a character that is quick at evasion, but has few life points. (4) Name: the name of the character. This is an important distinction that, as you know, cannot have 2 characters of the same name at a time on the battlefield. In this example, their name is ‘Black Fox’. (5) Type: the type that pertains to the character. Like you know, the cards that can affect them depend on their types. (6) Level: the level of the character in question. In some cases, this level will depend on if you can attack other characters or not or if they are affected by certain effects. Furthermore, they will be the points that are won by the enemy player in case of defeat by this character. In the example, this character is ‘level 2’. (7) Magic points: the points of spiritual, white, or black magic that the character can use for spells. Logically, characters that are simply fighters cannot have any magic points. In this example, they have ‘4 points of spiritual magic’ and ‘4 points of white magic’. (8) Cooperation values: the possibility that the character cooperates with other characters. In this example, they will be able to cooperate with other characters that also have ‘cooperation B’ or ‘cooperation E’. (9) Illustration: an illustrated image of the character in question. In the majority of cases, these images have been taken from either the Slayer novels, manga, or artbooks, although in some specific cases, they are completely new images and drawings created specifically for the game. In this example, it is an image taken from a volume of Slayers, but retouched and coloured later. (10) Card type: the class or type of card it is, in this case, ‘character’. (11) Artist: who has drawn the illustration for said card. The majority of the game cards are illustrated by Rui Araizumi, and the rest are by Tommy Otsuka and Shoko Yoshinaka. In this example, the illustration is by Rui Araizumi. (12) Special Ability: name of the character’s special ability, and its moment between the parenthesis. In this case, it is ‘splendid theft (normal)’. (13) Description of special ability: text explaining the character’s special ability. In this example, the text says ‘in a place of attacking, you can make it so that the enemy player has to discard one fate card’. Therefore, during the player’s turn, this character will be able to either attack or use their special ability, making the enemy player lose 1 of the cards in their hand. (14) Copyright: a small copyright annotation about the game and its creators. It is on all the cards, with the only change being between the first series from 1999, the first expansion from 2000, and the second expansion from 2001. The copyright pertains to Hajime Kanzaka, Rui Araizumi, ORG, and Kadokawa Shoten. (15) Number and symbol: the number identifies the card in question and the symbol represents the difficulty of obtaining it. In this example, the card number is 085 and the symbol is a rhombus.

Spell Cards


Spell type cards:

The ‘spell’ type cards (呪文カード jumon kādo, ‘spell card’) are those through which characters with magical capability will be able to use attacks at a distance in the form of spells, as well as other effects that can increase the attack or defense statistics, paralyze the enemy, eliminate damaging effects, or invoke creatures.

[image: red dot with the word ‘black’ in the middle. To the right of it is a red 5.]

As you saw in the section dedicated to ‘character’ cards, characters with magical capability specifically indicate what magic they are capable of using between the 3 types (spiritual, white, and black), and also the quantity of magical power that they can use for each type of magic. Each ‘spell’ type card has certain necessities for both type of magic as well as magic power. Therefore, some spells will only be able to be used by characters that can use this specific type of magic as well as have a sufficient quantity of magic power to use it. For example, in order to use a spell that has the requirements that you see on the image to the left, you need a character that has 5 or more points of black magic.

Black - white - spiritual

Regarding attack spells, their statistics function in the same way as the characters’, that is to say, with the values of hit probability and power. In the same way that it occurs in melee attack, the spell’s hit probability must be compared with the evasion value of the target character, and if it is superior, you will compare the power value with resistance. In certain cases, the value of any of the 2 statistics, or the both, can be an asterisk (*). If this happens with the hit probability, it means that it will always hit the target, regardless of the evasion value. If this happens with the power value, it means that said spell causes no damage at all, so its effect will be different (protection, invocation/summoning, etc).

Hit probability - power

In some cases spells can have 2 magic power values, at their turn they will have 2 different hit probability and power values. In these cases, and always depending on the magical capability of the character that uses the spell, it may be able to chose what quantity of magic is used in the spell, since each one can have not a single different statistic, excluding different effects (you can see this in the example card that is found further below). There are also exclusives that were added in the second expansion of the game, and on those you can see a golden star in place of a magic value in the requirements of the spell. In this case, in order to execute the spell, you will need the same magic value, and the effect of the star that you will activate in certain circumstances (for example, if there is some other certain type of spell that can be conjured at the same time or if it has been conjured previously). [nts: review]

In the same way they occur in the series (even if they have been avoided many times) spells have a time of execution, in other words, what has been taken in reciting the Words of Chaos of the spell in order to invoke its power before it is used. This time it is based on turns, so you will have to plan it with the appropriate spells when using it, since you will have to be able to take varied turns in order for it to be useful.

The moment of conjuring can be in 0, 1, 2, 3, and up to 4 turns. In the case of spells with the 0 moment of conjuring, these are considered instantaneous and therefore are used in this same moment. You must remember that for “turn” we are referring to each period of time in which each player can execute their actions, and in order to resolve the spells you should take the “turn of game”, and not the individual turn in which you find each player. For example, if you are on your turn and use a spell during the moment of conjuring 1, the effect of it will be in the following turn, in other words, the turn of your opponent.

Just like character names, there is not much more to take into account with spell types than how often they occur, since the information is mostly informative. As always, you must take into account that in your ‘library’ deck you will only have a maximum of 4 cards of the same spell.

black - white - spiritual - water - air - fire - earth - astral

Like I mentioned in the ‘character’ type section, strangely Filia is the only character who has divine magic points, in spite of there not being any divine spells in the game. It is not known if they had intended to add divine spells and never did but in the end they were left there and could possibly be a typing error. Although different from the original meaning, in order for a game to be played, it is easiest to treat these values as if they they were white magic points.

objective - additional effect

As usual, the spells have an objective, but this time it depends on what character or characters use the spell, or also what zone is affected. The most common objectives of the spells are usually ‘an enemy’ or ‘an ally’, and different combinations of these according to certain quantities and zones, like, for example, ‘2 enemies in the vanguard’, or ‘an enemy and the client’.

Besides the damage that they can cause (in the case of attack spells), the spells have an additional effect, that of course is some kind of specific effect that can happen (besides damage from, in this case, attack spells). In the case of spells that don’t do any damage, the additional effect will the be only action, therefore, the description would only be describing the effect. You will have to take into account that this effect can be temporary or permanent, and in either of these cases it must withstand characters who can affect said effects, since during the game the effects can be easily forgotten about.

To continue, you will find an example of a basic ‘spell’ type card with all of its different parameters and explanations, and on the opposite side of the table is an example of any of this same type. Like you can see, the colour that characterizes this type of card is red, in addition to this it has other indicators in the upper part of the card that are very different from the rest of the cards: its magic power, attack statistic, and moment of conjuring.

[left image: spell card numbered 1-12; text says ‘this is a spell card’] [right image: spell card. Red circle in upper left corner says ‘black’, text in parenthesis under ‘Assher Dist’ says ‘black’, red oval on bottom right of illustration says ‘spell’, first red oval in box says ‘objective’ text next to it says ‘an enemy (normal)’, second red oval in box says ‘additional’ and text underneath says ‘if the objective is defeat, it will not be sent to the scoring deck, but the graveyard deck’]

Magical power: the quantity of magic power that is necessary and that the character must have to use the spell. In this example, it uses ‘3 points of black magic’ or ‘5 points of black magic’. Attack statistics: the hit probability and power value of the spell. In the example, depending on which magic power the spell uses, it can have ‘hit probability 4 and power 6’ or ‘hit probability 6 and power 6’. Moment of conjuring: the number of turns that it takes to conjure the spell. In this case, the moment of conjuring is ‘0 turns’, that is, it is an instantaneous spell. Name: the name of the spell. In this example, it is ‘Assher Dist’. Type (magic): which category pertains to the spell. In the example, it is ‘black magic’. Illustration: an illustrated image of the event in question. In the majority of cases, the images are taken from the novels, manga, or artbooks of Slayers, but in some cases, there are totally new images and drawings specifically for the game. In this case, it is a new image created for the game. Type of card: the type of card it is; in this example, it’s ‘spell’. Artist: who has created the image for said card. The majority of the game cards are illustrated by Rui Araizumi, and the rest by Tommy Otsuka and Shoko Yoshinaka. In the example, it is an illustration by Tommy Otsuka. Objective: what type and quantity of characters can affect the spell, as well as the moment which is between parenthesis. In this case, the objective is ‘an enemy (normal)’. Additional effect: the description of the spell or additional effect that it can provoke. In this example, it is indicated that ‘if the objective is defeat, you will not be sent to the scoring deck, rather the graveyard deck’. Therefore, a defeated character with this spell would not increase the score of the player. Copyright: a small copyright annotation about the game and its creators. This is the same on all cards with the only change being that the first series came out in 1999, the first expansion in 2000, and the second expansion in 2001. The copyright pertains to Hajime Kanzaka, Rui Araizumi, ORG, and Kadokawa Shoten. Number and symbol: the identifying number of the card in question, as well as the symbol that represents the difficulty of finding it. In this case, the card number is 119 and the symbol is a triangle.



Support Cards


Support type cards:

The ‘support’ type cards (攻撃補助カード kougeki hojo kādo, ‘attack assistance card’) are cards that can be used to support the characters during their attacks or to help them protect themselves from enemy attacks. Having this unique feature, it is important to know that this card type is the only one that can be used during the battle phase, and furthermore, only once an attack has been declared (it is an allied attack to the enemy, or an enemy attack to an ally).

All of the support cards function in the same way, but their requirements differentiate between 2 different types: those that require magic points to be used and those that require attack or defense values.

[image: 3 red circles with the number 5 next to them]

The support type cards that require magic points work in a similar way to the character cards, in the sense that they influence values of different types of magic, only 1 will be necessary to be able to use the card. Observing the image the image above, this card requires ‘5 spiritual magic points’, ‘5 white magic points’, or ‘5 black magic points’, but not all 3, only 1 of them.

[image: 2 black ovals. Left oval has a 5, right oval has a 4.]

The support type cards that require attack or defense values can seem strange compared with the rest of the cards that have different requirements, but their use is easier. In these cases, the card will need a specific quantity of one of the attack values (hit probability or power) or defense (resistance or evasion) of the character that will use it. Viewing the 2 images that are found above, we have on one side a card that requires ‘hit probability 5’, in other words, only a character that has 5 or more hit probability points will be able to use this card; and on the other side, we have a card that requires ‘at maximum 4 points of resistance’, that is, it will only be able to be used by characters that have 4 or less points of resistance.

A correct time for these requirements, like i have already said, is always the end of an attack, when the card will be able to be used. As with the spell cards, the support cards have an objective, or in other words, what character or what other card is going to suffer the effect of the support card. Also like the spell cards and the special abilities of the characters, in many cases the objective is simply ‘a character’, ‘an ally’, or ‘an enemy’, but support cards can be more specific in some cases, being able to have an objective like ‘the character who used the card’ or ‘an ally spell that has the same objective as an enemy’, or on the contrary, something more generic like ‘any card’.

Like the rest of the cards, support cards also have a (moment), but similar to ‘event’ cards, in this case it is somewhat irrelevant, seeing as these cards are the only ones that can be used in a specific moment that is during an attack, which is why said information can be ignored without problems.

Being used exclusively during combat, the majority of support cards have temporary effects, which are instantaneous or 1 turn in duration. But even so, there are some support cards whose effects are permanently maintained throughout the game or until certain events occur.

Underneath you will find a basic example of a support card with all of its differentiating parameters and explanations, and on the opposite side is an example of a card of the same type. Like you can see, the colour that characterizes this card is yellow, and for further differentiation are the rest of the requirements you need in order to use the card.

[left image: a support card numbered 1 to 9. text says ‘this is a support card’.] [right image: red circles in top left read (left to right) ‘spiritual, white, black’; title says ‘alter explosion’; text in red oval on bottom right of illustration says ‘support’; first red oval in lower box says ‘objective’ and the text beside it says ‘spell that has the objective of an enemy (counter-spell)’; second red oval says ‘effect’ and text next to it says ‘if the spell affects 1 enemy of a line (military line), it will happen to affect the entire line, but your power value will be reduced by 1 point. You can use different ‘change’ cards at the time around the objective spell’.]

Requirements: the different values, which can be magic power, attack, or defense values, that are required to use the card. In the example, it requires ‘5 points of spiritual magic’, ‘5 points of white magic’, or ‘5 points of black magic’. Name: the name of the card. In this example, ‘alter explosion’. Illustration: an illustrated image of the event in question. In the majority of cases, the images have been taken from the novels, manga, or artbooks of Slayers, although in some cases are completely new images and drawings specifically for the game. In this case, it is an illustration taken from one of the novels of sagaSpecial, replicated and coloured afterward. Card type: the type of card it is, in the example, ‘support’. Artist: who has made the illustration for said card. The majority of the game cards are illustrated by Rui Araizumi and the rest by Tommy Otsuka and Shoko Yoshinaka. In this example, the illustration is by Rui Araizumi. Objective: the objective of the card in question, and its moment in parenthesis. In this example, ‘spell that has the objective of an enemy (counter-spell)’. Effect: text explaining the effect of the card. In this case, ‘if the spell affects 1 enemy of a line (military line), it will happen to affect the entire line, but your power value will be reduced by 1 point. You can use different ‘change’ cards at the time around the objective spell’. In other words, it is used around an allied spell so that it affects more enemy characters, but does less damage; in addition, it cannot be used by an allied character that conjured the spell, but instead by another character; and finally, it can be used at the same time as other support cards that modify the spell. Copyright: a small copyright annotation about the game and its creators. It is the same on all the cards, save for the date which changes with the first series in 1999, the first expansion in 2000, and the second expansion in 2001. The copyright pertains to Hajime Kanzaka, Rui Araizumi, ORG, and Kadokawa Shoten. Number and symbol: the identifying number of the card in question, along with the symbol that represents the difficulty of finding it. In the example, its card number is 167 and its symbol is a triangle.


Event Cards


Event cards:

The cards of the ‘event’ type (イベントカード ibento kādo, ‘event card’) are the type of cards that can normally be used to modify the development of the game in one form or another, for example, modifying the attributes or value of magic power of a character card, as well as calling certain characters, or making it so that the player can have more or less cards in their hand.

In the same way as the character cards, the event cards also function with a system of accumulating attributes through client cards. And in the same way as these, the influence of power counts as more than 1 different attribute, only 1 of these will be necessary in order to use it. As I’ve already explained in the section dedicated to rules used in the game, the event cards must be used according to their moment, and in no more than the phase of each turn does its effect apply: ‘adjust card phase’, ‘performance phase’, ‘battle phase’, ‘battle or invocation phase’, ‘end of turn phase’, and the generic ‘any moment’.

Moment - card adjustment time - performance time - battle time - battle or invocation time - end of turn - any moment

As they occur in character and spell cards, the event cards also have a specific (moment), but in this specific case it is a simple detail without much value. In these cards there is a moment that indicates the use of the card and its effect, which is why you can really avoid it.

Apart from this, the event cards don’t have anything else special about them. Some can have small temporary effects and others can be permanent (or until they are cancelled), which is why you will have to have a current description of each card before it is used.

Underneath you will find an example of a basic event card with all of its differentiating parameters and explanations, and on the opposite side is an example of any card of the same type. Like you can see, the colour that characterizes this card type is green.

[left image: an event card numbered 1-9. The text says ‘this is an event card’.] [right image: an event card. The title says ‘find it’ and the oval on the bottom right corner of the illustration says ‘event’. The text in the first oval in the box says ‘moment’ while the text next to it says ‘battle or invocation phase (normal/against)’. The second oval says ‘effect’ and the text beside it says ‘use it around a character that is on the battlefield or in the player’s hand. Modifies one of the attributes for ‘evil’ for ‘1 turn’’.]

Attributes: the attributes this card and the quantity necessary for it. In the example, it can use ‘2 points of originality’ or ‘3 points of evil’. Name: the name of the card. In this example, ‘find it’. Illustration: an illustrated image of the event in question. In the majority of cases, the image is taken from the novels, manga, or artbooks of Slayers, though in some cases there are completely new images drawn specifically for the game. In this case, the illustration is from the third novel of the main saga. Card type: the type of card it is, in the example, ‘event’. Artist: who has created the illustration for said card. The majority of the cards in the game are by Rui Araizumi while the rest are by Tommy Otsuka and Shoko Yoshinaka. In this example, the illustration is by Rui Araizumi. Moment: the phrase of the player’s turn when said card can be used, and the type of moment it is. In this case, ‘battle or invocation phase (normal/against)’. Effect: text explaining the effect of the event in question. In the example ‘use it around a character that is on the battlefield or in the player’s hand. Modifies one of the attributes for ‘evil’ for ‘1 turn’’. Copyright: a small copyright annotation about the game and its creators. This is the same on all cards except for the date which is 1999 for the first series, 2000 for the first expansion, and 2001 for the second expansion. The copyright pertains to Hajime Kanzaka, Rui Araizumi, ORG, and Kadokawa Shoten. Number and symbol: the identifying number of the card in question along with the symbol that represents the difficulty of finding it. In this example, the card’s number is 208 and its symbol is a triangle.

Part 5 - phases of each turn


This game, similar to others of this type, is divided into turns, that are merely periods of time during the game in which each player executes their actions. And similar to what occurs in many other games, each turn is divided into different phases, executing certain actions in each of the phases. Here I am going to explain one by one and in detail the 5 phases that are divided in Slayers Fight, that, as have already been said, are named: card adjustment phase, performance phase, battle phase, invocation phase, and end of turn phase.

Card adjustment phase


The first phase that is divided of the turn is the ‘card adjustment phase’ (手札調整フェイズ tefuda chousei feizu, ‘adjustment of hand phase’). If it is the player’s first turn, they will take 6 cards from the ‘library’ deck, this being the maximum number of cards that you will be able to have in your hand during the game (except if there is an objective of a certain effect that reduces or increases said quantity).

If this is not the first turn, the player will be able to discard the number of cards they want to (they can discard all if they’d like to do so), and take from the library deck the number of cards they need until they have the maximum again.

Logically, in the situation in which the player has no cards in their library deck, they will be able to discard their cards if they wish to, but now they will be incapable of replenishing their hand. In spite of not being able to take more cards, they will be able to continue playing while they have cards in their hand and in the battlefield and when the enemy player continues to have cards in their library deck. In the moment in which neither of the two players have cards in either library deck, the game will end automatically, the winning player, the player that has the higher score at this moment.

Performance phase


Performance phase:

The second phase of the turn is the ‘performance phase’ (パフォーマンス・フェイズ pafōmansu feizu, ‘action phase’). Like you saw in the section dedicated to detailed explanations of the cards, each client has given attributes that will be used to call characters and use event cards. As well, during the performance phase the player can choose to increase 1 of these attributes 1 point. In this way, attribute points are accumulated turn by turn and are not reduced when used. This accumulation, as well as being necessary to call characters and use event cards, is totally voluntary, and if the player can decide not to accumulate any points if they wish to.

In order to constantly accumulate points, you do not necessarily need use a marker or paper or any kind of notes (although this is recommended to keep track of the different quantities), but instead you can use cards from the library deck. To chose what attribute you want to accumulate points, you will take 1 card from the library and will place it horizontally to the client card where said attribute is found.

In the image on the left, which as you can remember is the illustrated part of the battlefield, you can see the layout of cards that marks each of the accumulated points for each attribute. In this particular case, we would find ourselves a player that would’ve accumulated 1 point of each of the 4 different attributes of this certain client.

Battle Phase


Battle phase:

The third phase of the turn is the ‘battle’ phase (戦闘フェイズ sentou feizu, ‘battle phase’). This means that it is this moment in which the player chooses what action they are going to execute with their characters, with the ability to choose between 4 possibilities: execute a melee attack, conjure a spell, use a special ability, or move themself in the battlefield to some front or another. Logically, if the player doesn’t have characters in the battlefield, or if they are useless do to some effect, the player cannot use event cards (the description indicates in which phase these cards can be used) and support cards, whether it is their own battle phase or that of the enemy player. Equally present during the battle which can be used are 2 forms of cooperation, explained in the section dedicated to character cards. These 2 forms are assistance by means of cooperating on an attack and protection by means of cooperation on defense.

As a general rule, each character will be able to execute only 1 of the 4 mentioned actions, although in certain cases relating to special abilities, the character can use said ability and, subsequently, execute some of the other 3 actions. This will be clearly indicated in the description of each character’s special ability.

You can consider this phase divided into two sub-phases: the first phase of action, where the player indicates which characters are going to execute the different possible actions, and the second phase of reaction where said actions take place and have corresponding results. For us to better understand this, imagine that the player cannot indicate that character ‘A’ is going to attack, carries out said attack, and then afterward indicates that the other character, ‘B’, is going to attack as well, without indicating that character A, like character B, was going to attack, which is required. For this reason, it is important to clearly indicate during the first sub-phase what type of action is going to be executed by each character, if anyone is going to move, use a special ability, attack, or cast a spell.

Moving on the battlefield is a very simple action. A character that is in the vanguard will be able to move back to the rearguard, and one that is in the rearguard is able to advance to the vanguard. The only reason for this action is to have different characters rearranged on a line or on another battlefield.

In the example you see below, on one side is the character Conny who can move back from the vanguard to the rearguard, and on the other side is the character Erisiel Vrumugun from the rearguard who can advance to the vanguard, however the character Riol from the rearguard cannot advance to the vanguard because his card clearly indicates that he must be kept only in the rearguard, and furthermore, if for some reason a forced attack moves him to the vanguard, he becomes automatically defeated.

[an image of a card set up]

If the player decides to use a special ability, the turn’s development and resolution will depend on the description of each one, which is why it is important to read them and to always have them, since they can literally change the course of the game.

What you must take into account is the order in which you will use the special abilities and furthermore if you are going to use it in an action combined with another special ability, attack, spell, event, or support, since it will not be the same if the effect in the first action is resolved before or after executing the second action. And as usual, to better understand, we have an example:

Example:


On one side, we have player A who has the characters Martina and Lemy in their battlefield. On the other side, we have player B who has the character Meena in their battlefield. Martina’s special ability, which is active type, allows for canceling a special ability of the objective character for 1 turn. Lemy’s special ability, which is passive type, makes them attack in all phases of battle. Meena’s special ability, which is also passive type, permits that if Meena is defeated, the enemy that defeated her will also be automatically defeated. Case 1: Lemy attacks and Martina uses her ability - phase 1: Lemy, with the attack values 6/6, attacks Meena who has the defense values 2/2 and she is defeated. - phase 2: thanks to Meena’s special ability, since she was defeated, Lemy in turn is defeated. - phase 3: since Martina has already used her ability against Lemy, she cannot use it again to defeat him. - phase 4: player A wins ‘+1 point’ for Meena, but player B also gains ‘+2 points’ for Lemy. Case 2: Martina uses her special ability and Lemy attacks - phase 1: Martina uses her ability, cancelling Meena’s ability. - phase 2: Lemy, with the attack values 6/6, attacks Meena, who has the defense values 2/2, and she is defeated. - phase 3: since Meena has had her ability cancelled, only she is defeated and Lemy survives. - phase 4: player A gains ‘+1 point’ for Meena.

Furthermore, you should take into account the situations in which characters can execute 2 actions in a single turn, the special ability will always have to be your first action, and because of this, you must be able to know what you are going to ‘spend’ your action on. However, if you decide to do a melee attack or use a spell before, you will not be able to use a special ability after.

If the player decides to execute a melee attack, they should first view the character cards so that they can compare attack values of the character attacking with the defense values of the character being attacked: specifically, hit probability compared with evasion, and power compared with resistance.

For a more visual example, here you can see that Gourry is attacking the character Cremia. With the white rectangle, values have been compared that must be taken into account during this action: Gourry’s attack and Cremia’s defense. In green are the speed values that should be compared first: the hit probability of Gourry (9) with the evasion of Cremia (4). And in red, you can see the strength values that should be compared afterwards: the power of Gourry (6) with the resistance of Cremia (8). In this specific case, Gourry hits Crimea (9>4), but doesn’t cause enough damage to defeat her (6>8).

[image: card on left says ‘Serious Gourry’ and smaller text underneath it says ‘(man)’. Card on right says ‘Cremia and the Great Mysterious Fish’ and the smaller text underneath says ‘(woman & monster)’]

Of course this is only the outcome if you’re playing with these cards with the same basic values, but remember that during this phase you can use special abilities, spells, event cards, and support cards that will be able to help Gourry defeat Cremia . Therefore, we will continue with this same example, taking into account what was previously spoken about: the fact that some characters can execute 2 actions during this phase, using an ability and attacking. Gourry in specific is a good example in this situation: you can use his special ability to increase his power (?) value x10, and afterwards execute an attack. Therefore if we had used his said ability, we would’ve defeated Cremia without problems.

Something you have to take into account during the battle phase is that the player who executes the attack is the one who decides which enemy characters will attack. Or, in other words, the enemy player cannot choose which characters of theirs will defend themselves from these attacks. Therefore, logically, the player will only choose characters to execute their attacks that they know have a possibility of defeating the enemy players, either on their own or with the help of the many special abilities, spells, event cards, or support cards that can also be used.

Like I have said, it is the player who decides the attack objectives of the characters, but this decision is subject to many factors that can limit their options. On one hand, 2 characters cannot execute melee attack on the same enemy in the same turn, although it can happen in a case in which a character attacks an enemy and is supported in their attack by a special ability or another character’s spell (including a character of the rearguard by means of the cooperation ‘help’). As a general rule, you will not be able to melee attack enemies found in the rearguard. And furthermore, the enemy client will not be able to be melee attacked while any enemy characters are left in the battlefield.

Since this is perhaps a complicated concept to understand at first, we will return to visual examples to better understand it. In these examples, player A controls Cremia and Erisiel, and enemy player B controls Gourry, Black Fox, and Conny (the last being in the rearguard). The image (1) shows a more simple case: each character attacking a different enemy without major problems. The image (2) shows a character attempting to melee attack an enemy in the rearguard, something that is impossible to do without a special ability or spell that permits them to (this is not the case). The image (3) shows 2 characters attempting to melee attack the same character, something that cannot be done in any case.

[the 3 images of the situations]

The image (4) shows 2 characters attacking the same character, but using different methods, something that is permitted (in this case, melee and spell, also they would have to be with a special ability). The image (5) shows a character attacking an enemy in the rearguard with a spell, something that is permitted. Finally, the image (6) shows a character attacking an enemy while the other tries to melee attack the client, something that cannot be done while there are still enemies in the battlefield.

[the images of the 3 other situations]

You should know this well so that you can efficiently coordinate your attacks. The main and basic rule is that you cannot melee attack with more characters than enemies are in your opponent’s vanguard. When you’ve taken into account the possible exceptions to this rule, you will be able to take other actions according to what you are going to see as necessary. Like shown in the last option, you can opt to conjure a spell, as long as the character in question has sufficient magic power to carry it out. When you have a character with sufficient magical power and a spell card in hand, what you will be able to do with the spell alone depends on the moment of conjuring that it has, though first you must place it in the battlefield face-down, near the character that is going to conjure it. This way indicates the layout for what the said character is going to use in their turn, when they conjure a spell.

[image: text at the top of back card says ‘Crimea & the Great Mysterious Fish’]

The next phase will depend on the time of conjuring for the spell in question, which I have already explained, following the scheme of turns for each player, and not the turns of the game. Therefore, if it is ‘0’, the spell resolves immediately during the same turn. If it is ‘1’, it will resolve itself during the next phase of battle of the enemy player. If it is ‘2’, it will resolve itself in the next battle phase of the player, and it continues successively like this, as you can see in the following scheme of turns.


Game turn 1 Game turn 2 Game turn 3 Game turn 4 Game turn 5 Game turn 6 Game turn 7 Game turn 8 Game turn 9 Game turn 10 Player A turn 1 Player B turn 1 Player A turn 2 Player B turn 2 Player A turn 3 Player B turn 3 Player A turn 4 Player B turn 4 Player A turn 5 Player A turn 5





Conjured 0 Resolved










Conjured 1 Resolved









Conjured 2


Resolved








Conjured 3



Resolved







Conjured 4




Resolved



Of course, you must take into account that the character cannot execute another action during the turns in which they have conjured a spell. Because of this, I recommend that you place the mages in the rearguard so that you have less possibility of an enemy attacking them while they are conjuring a spell.

Once you have carried out the time of conjuring, you will return to the card and indicate what spell it is. If it is in the moment in which the enemy player cannot cancel a spell, your resolution will then occur, having taken into account that you can say that there are 3 types of spells, depending on their effects: those that have an immediate effect (normally those of attack, which cause damage and then end), those that have a temporary effect (like increasing or decreasing statistics for a limited time), and those that have a permanent effect (those that are maintained the entire time unless cancelled). Once the player has finished using all the different actions on their characters, the battle phase will end, and next will be the invocation phase.

Invocation Phase


Invocation phase:

The fourth phase of the turn is the ‘invocation’ phase (召喚フェイズ shoukan feizu, ‘invocation phase’). For most of this phase, the player will be able to take characters out of the battlefield that they have in their hand, and for those that fulfil the invocation requirements that are, as you have already seen, based on different qualities of the different attributes that the client has and that have been accumulated by the player. Furthermore, you can also use different event cards (if the card’s description indicates that they may be used in this phase).

The development of this phase is fairly simple. The player checks what character cards they have in their hand in this moment to see if they have enough attribute points to use any. In a case in which they do, they will be able to place the card in the battlefield, as well as in the vanguard and the rearguard (though they must always have the specific guidelines for each card). Or in the case of an event card, you will indicate their use and this will be resolved according to the corresponding.

You can also have a case in which the battlefield has some character or spell, or can use the event card, which has the effect to invoke a certain character that is in your hand at the moment. In said case, this character will be placed in the battlefield, regardless of if they have sufficient attribute points accumulated or not.

You must take into account that accumulated attribute points are not used up when invoking a character or using an event card.

Example:

We have a player that has in their hand many cards, of them, the characters Jade Codewell, Sylphiel, Natalie, and Dimos Dragon. The player has accumulated 3 popularity points, 2 justice points, and 2 wealth points. The character Jade Codewell requires 3 justice points or 3 popularity points. The character Sylphiel requires 3 popularity points or 4 common sense points. The character Natalie requires 6 popularity points and 7 justice points. The character Dimos Dragon doesn’t have any requirements, now that he is invoked by means of magic. During this phase of invocation, the player can invoke Jade Codewell as well as Sylphiel, but they do not have enough points to invoke Natalie, and cannot invoke Dimos Dragon through this method. In the case that you have the character Marlene, or any other character with the capability to use the following spell, in your battlefield, you would be able to use their special ability to cast the spell Gu Ru Duga, and in this way, you would invoke the character Dimos Dragon into the battlefield.

In the case that you do not have sufficient attribute points to invoke any character cards or event cards, and cannot use any other means that would invoke a character, the turn will simply move forward without having been able to execute any action during it.

As a general rule, the characters cannot attack during the invocation phase, unless it is specified in your description or the description of a special ability, spell, or event which has been used to invoke a character.


End of turn


End of turn phase:

The fifth and last phase of the turn is simply called ‘end of turn’ (終了フェイズ shuuryou feizu, ‘phase of ending’). The main objective of this phase is simply to let the enemy player know that now you have executed all your possible actions during the turn and that, therefore, it is their turn.

Besides this, if during their turn the player has used cards in their hand, during this phase they will draw new cards for their hand, taking from the library deck the cards they need until they have the maximum cards permitted in their hand once again. Here, unlike what occurs during the card adjustment phase, during this turn you cannot discard any card that is still in your hand.

Once you have done this, you will clearly indicate to the enemy player that you have finished all the actions of your turn, and that it is therefore the start of their turn.

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